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BN2/3/9032S

The Revelation to John in Christian theology and testimony

elective unit for postgraduates

Revelation (apokalypsis) is central to Christian theology. The Revelation to John is a specific expression of Christian writing that makes explicit many aspects of revelation that are tacit within gospels and epistles. Some of these aspects include hyperbolic textures in expression of biblical eschatology and the seeming surrealism of futurity with the signature ears to hear for the response of faith. This unit will explore within The Revelation to John, its peculiar interface between literary style and theological overture, which is cast for specific reception of Christian promise and testimony within difficult contexts of human life.

Upon successful completion of this unit, it is expected that

Second level students will be able to:

Identify and begin critically to evaluate diverse theological approaches to The Revelation to John;
Identify models of interpretation in relation to Revelation in particular and apocalyptic language in general;
Articulate potential contemporary uses of Revelation and apocalyptic language in Christian theology and testimony;
Third level students will be able to:

Identify literary features common to diverse expressions of apocalyptic language in New Testament writings and Christian proclamation;
Identify and critically evaluate diverse theological approaches to The Revelation to John and apocalyptic language;
Formulate and apply critical criteria for evaluating contemporary uses of apocalyptic language in Christian theology and testimony;
Demonstrate critical awareness of hermeneutical issues arising in the interface between Revelation and Christian theology
Postgraduates will be able to:

Identify and critically evaluate diverse theological approaches to apocalyptic language in New Testament writings and Christian proclamation;
Formulate and apply critical criteria for evaluating contemporary uses of apocalyptic language in Christian theology and testimony;
Demonstrate critical awareness of hermeneutical issues arising in the interface between Revelation and Christian theology;
Exhibit competence in formulating research criteria and methods for engaging apocalyptic tone and Christian literature

Faculty: Dr Stephen Curkpatrick

Offered: second semester 2016

Pre-requisites:

2nd Level: Introduction to Systematic Theology
3rd Level: 45 points in Systematic Theology;

or if taken as a Biblical Studies unit:

(2nd level) 15 points in Biblical Studies and 15 points in Systematic Theology;
(3rd level) 45 points in Biblical Studies and 15 points in Systematic Theology

postgraduate: 15 points (Foundational), Introduction to Systematic Theology

Assessment:

Second level
Four 500 word document studies 50%
Two 1250 word essays 50%

Third level
Four 600 word document studies 50%
Two 1300 word essays or one 2,500 word essay 50%

Postgraduate
Four 750 word document studies 50%
One 3000 word essay 50%

Select Bibliography;

Richard Bauckham, The Climax of Prophecy: Studies in the Book of Revelation, Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1993.
Maurice Blanchot, The Writing of the Disaster, new ed., trans. Ann Smock: Lincoln & London: U of Nebraska P, 1995.
Giovanna Borradori, Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida, Chicago and London: U of Chicago P, 2003.
Sergius Bulgakov, The Bride of the Lamb, trans. Boris Jakim, Grand Rapids & Edinburgh: Eerdmans & T&T Clark, 2002.
Rudolph Bultmann, History and Eschatology: The Gifford Lectures 1955, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1957.
Neal De Roo & John Panteleimon Manoussakis, eds. Phenomenology and Eschatology: Not Yet in the Now, Farnham GB: Ashgate, 2009.
Jacques Derrida, “On a Newly Arisen Apocalyptic Tone in Philosophy,” trans. John Leavey Jr. ed. Peter Fenves, Raising the Tone of Philosophy: Late Essays by Immanuel Kant, Transformative Critique by Jacques Derrida, Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins UP, 1993.
Wilfrid J. Harrington OP, Revelation (Sacra Pagina), Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1993, 2008.
Anthony Kelly, Eschatology and Hope, Maryknoll, New York: Orbis, 2006.
Frank Kermode, The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction, Oxford et al.: OUP, 2000.
Ulrich H.J. Körtner, The End of the World: A Theological Interpretation, trans. Douglas W. Stott, Louisville: WJKP, 1995.
Joseph L. Mangina, Revelation, Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2010.
Paul Ricoeur, History and Truth, trans. & intro. Charles A. Kelbley, Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1965.
Paul Ricoeur, The Symbolism of Evil, trans. Emerson Buchanan, Boston: Beacon Press, 1967.