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BA1/8001S

Introducing the Hebrew Bible

Also taught online as BA1/8701S

Foundational unit for postgraduates

Content: This unit is an introduction to the diversity of Hebrew traditions, through exploration of a number of themes that run through the Hebrew Bible. The unit will explore the possible relationships between these themes and different historical, geographical and traditional contexts; introduce modern schools of study, as well as the history of research into the Hebrew Bible; and enable students to develop a familiarity with exegetical tools and methods, using problem-based learning.

Learning objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit

Undergraduate students will be able to:

  1. Describe the historical and social world of the Hebrew Bible
  2. Demonstrate a working familiarity with a range of interpretive approaches to the Hebrew Bible
  3. Effectively use the tools for biblical interpretation: lexicons, dictionaries, commentaries, journals, monographs and primary sources
  4. Develop and summarize an awareness of and appreciation for the history of Hebrew Bible research and a variety of interpretive approaches current in biblical scholarship
  5. Apply theological and hermeneutical applications of the Hebrew Bible to their current context

Postgraduate students will be able to:

  1. Describe and discuss the historical and social world of the Hebrew Bible
  2. Demonstrate competence with a range of interpretive approaches to the Hebrew Bible
  3. Effectively use the tools for biblical interpretation: lexicons, dictionaries, commentaries, journals, monographs and primary sources
  4. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the history of Hebrew Bible research, and critique a range of current scholarly approaches
  5. Analyse and apply theological and hermeneutical applications of the Hebrew Bible to their current context

 

Pre-requisites: none

Faculty: Angela Sawyer

Offered: in first semester 2017 (face-to-face and online)

Assessment:

Undergraduate (face to face and online)

One 2,000 word essay 50%
One 500 word critical reflection on set reading 10%
One 1,500 word tutorial paper 40%

 

Postgraduate (face to face and online)

One 3,000 word essay 50%
One 1000 word critical reflection on set reading 10%
One 2000 word tutorial paper (exegesis) 40%

 

Select Bibliography:

Baker, D. Tight fists or open hands? Grand Rapids, William B. Eerdmans, 2009.
*Birch, B. et al. Theological Introduction to the Old Testament. Nashville, Abingdon, 2005.
Broyles, C. (ed). Interpreting the Old Testament: A Guide for Exegesis. Grand Rapids, Baker, 2001.
Brueggemann, B. Old Testament Theology: Testimony, Dispute, Advocacy. Minneapolis, Fortress, 1997.
Campbell, Antony SJ. Experiencing Scripture. Adelaide: ATF: 2012.
Collins, J.  Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis, Fortress, 2004.
Fretheim, T. God & world in the Old Testament. Nashville, Abingdon, 2005.
Hanson, P. The People Called. London, Harper & Row, 1986.
Matthews, V, & D. Benjamin, Social world of Ancient Israel 1250-587 BCE. Peabody, Hendrickson, 1993.
Rogerson, J, & P. Davies. The Old Testament World. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1989.
*Steussy, M. (ed). Chalice Introduction to the Old Testament. St. Louis, Chalice, 2003.