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BA1/8001S

Introducing the Hebrew Bible

Also taught online as BA1/8701S

Foundational unit for postgraduates

Content:

This unit is an introduction to the diversity of the texts and traditions of the Hebrew Bible. The unit will explore different historical, geographical, literary and traditional contexts of the Hebrew Bible through a detailed exploration of specific texts; introduce modern schools of study, as well as history of research into the Hebrew Bible; and enable students to develop a familiarity with exegetical tools and methods, using problem-based learning.

Learning objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit

Undergraduate students will be able to:

  1. Describe the historical and social world of the Hebrew Bible
  2. Demonstrate a working familiarity with a range of interpretive approaches to the Hebrew Bible
  3. Effectively use the tools for biblical interpretation: lexicons, dictionaries, commentaries, journals, monographs and primary sources
  4. Develop and summarize an awareness of and appreciation for the history of Hebrew Bible research and a variety of interpretive approaches current in biblical scholarship
  5. Apply theological and hermeneutical applications of the Hebrew Bible to their current context

Postgraduate students will be able to:

  1. Describe and discuss the historical and social world of the Hebrew Bible
  2. Demonstrate competence with a range of interpretive approaches to the Hebrew Bible
  3. Effectively use the tools for biblical interpretation: lexicons, dictionaries, commentaries, journals, monographs and primary sources
  4. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the history of Hebrew Bible research, and critique a range of current scholarly approaches
  5. Analyse and apply theological and hermeneutical applications of the Hebrew Bible to their current context

 

Pre-requisites: none

Faculty: Angela Sawyer

Offered: in first semester 2017 (face-to-face and online)

Assessment:

Undergraduate (face to face and online)

One 1500 word essay 40%
One 500 word critical reflection on set reading 10%
One 1,750 word exegetical essay  50%

 

Postgraduate (face to face and online)

One 2,000 word essay 40%
One 1000 word critical reflection on set reading 10%
One 3000 word exegetical essay 50%

 

Select Bibliography:

* = set texts recommended for purchase

Baker, D. Tight fists or open hands? Grand Rapids, William B. Eerdmans, 2009.
Birch, B. et al. Theological Introduction to the Old Testament. Nashville, Abingdon, 2005.
Broyles, C. (ed). Interpreting the Old Testament: A Guide for Exegesis. Grand Rapids, Baker, 2001.
Brueggemann, B. Old Testament Theology: Testimony, Dispute, Advocacy. Minneapolis, Fortress, 1997.
Campbell, Antony SJ. Experiencing Scripture. Adelaide: ATF: 2012.
*Collins, J.  A Short Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis, Fortress, 2004.
Fretheim, T. God & world in the Old Testament. Nashville, Abingdon, 2005.
Hanson, P. The People Called. London, Harper & Row, 1986.
Matthews, V, & D. Benjamin, Social world of Ancient Israel 1250-587 BCE. Peabody, Hendrickson, 1993.
Rogerson, J, & P. Davies. The Old Testament World. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1989.
*Steussy, M. (ed). Chalice Introduction to the Old Testament. St. Louis, Chalice, 2003.